Find A Hidden Gem On Your Garage, You Might Be Owning Some Of These Vinyl Records

Published on 01/13/2021
ADVERTISEMENT

You can hear your favorite single or even album with one click nowadays. This wasn’t the case a few decades back. In the past, the easiest way to listen was to purchase or borrow a vinyl album. Fortunately, younger people also love these antique items. Sales grew due to the curiosity exhibited by younger folk. Overall, if it’s rarer, you might get more money for your record. That said, checking out your garage could be a good time! You better look at these because you might have a fortune hidden in your junk!

Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin (1969)

Led Zeppelin had a wonderful 1969. That was the year they debuted blues covers and original material. Nowadays, labeling the album as ‘iconic’ is not a stretch. In the past, though, it was labeled ‘as foppish as Rod Stewart, just nowhere near so thrilling.’ Rolling Stone might have despised this record. However, it was an instant commercial success. In 2013, Rolling Stone named it history’s 29th best record. You’d get $1000 for this record!

Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin (1969)

Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin (1969)

Miles Davis, Kind of Blue (1959)

Jazz enthusiasts will recognize that Miles Davis has revolutionized jazz several times in his career. His 1959 release, ‘Sort of Blue,’ remains his most valuable record to date. To make it, the best trumpeter ever worked with Cannonball Adderley, John Coltrane, Wynton Kelly, Bill Evans, Paul Chambers, and Jimmy Cobb. If you ask analysts, they’re likely to tell you it’s his most valuable record. If you have an initial record press, you will get $1,000 for it.

Miles Davis, Kind of Blue (1959)

Miles Davis, Kind of Blue (1959)

The Who, The Who Sell Out (1967)

It must be one of history’s rarest albums. The Who made just 1,000 copies, after all. Will you want to see how much this psychedelic butterfly poster can buy you? If you’re fortunate enough to have the song, it can be sold on eBay for $1,100!

The Who, The Who Sell Out (1967)

The Who, The Who Sell Out (1967)

Nirvana, Bleach (1989)

‘Nevermind’ might have had all the hit singles, but if you hold the ‘Bleach’ album, your bank account would be more grateful. They made a thousand prints, each selling for $2,500. Interestingly, the first thousand copies come in white. The 3rd press of blue 7″ vinyl and red and white 12″ had just 500 prints. You may market them for $1,100 each.

Nirvana, Bleach (1989)

Nirvana, Bleach (1989)

XTC — Science Friction (1977)

XTC was part of the British modern wave subgenre, which in the 1970s became popular. This album has a 12-inch duplicate, converted into a 7-inch copy. If you do discover a smaller duplicate, you might have $2,000 waiting for you. You’d need a lot of luck, however, since they only made 50 copies of it.

XTC — Science Friction (1977)

XTC — Science Friction (1977)

David Bowie — The Prettiest Star (1973)

It must be one of the most popular pictures in rock and roll culture. It had The Prettiest Star, one of his most popular hits. Did you know the song is dedicated to Angela Barnett, who once became his wife? He also performed on her phone. On this record, Mark Bolan, his future competitor. You will get $2,000 for a duplicate!

David Bowie — The Prettiest Star (1973)

David Bowie — The Prettiest Star (1973)

ABBA — Hova’s Vittne (1981)

The band sold red vinyl directly to the record company’s customers. Just 200 copies were pressed. The unusual record has side-A “Hova’s Vittne,” then side-B “Tivedshambo.” The Swedish band was among history’s most economically large musical acts. Knew the band composed of two couples? Sadly, their relationships were not under threat of popularity and fame. If this record survived over time, you would get $3,500 for it.

ABBA — Hova’s Vittne (1981)

ABBA — Hova’s Vittne (1981)

The Quarrymen — That’ll Be the Day (1981)

True music lovers know the Beatles’ Quarrymen has a fascinating background. “That’ll be Day” was pressed in 1958. His Buddy Holly album cover was a big success. However, one Beatles wanted to restore it. Paul McCartney replicated the single in just 50 copies. You will make $3,500 for the polished version.

The Quarrymen — That’ll Be the Day (1981)

The Quarrymen — That’ll Be the Day (1981)

Cherry Five — Cherry Five (1975)

Horror movie enthusiasts know this band was behind some amazing songs in movies like Deep Crimson, Suspiria, and Dead’s Dawn. However, the first update should concern you more. After all, it’s really unusual. While luck is on your hand, you can sell the self-titled album for $3,500.

Cherry Five — Cherry Five (1975)

Cherry Five — Cherry Five (1975)

David Bowie, Diamond Dogs (1974)

David Bowie always seemed to impress others. In 1974, he did the same for his iconic album cover name Diamond Puppies. The version wasn’t coming out. This album’s backside came with a dilemma revealing intimate bits of puppies. Anyway, it got a release. You should expect around $3,550 for it!

David Bowie, Diamond Dogs (1974)

David Bowie, Diamond Dogs (1974)

The Beatles — Abbey Road (1969)

This unique album record will get you as much as $4,000. There’s a way to tell if it’s a special UK exported copy. Next, a yellow and black Parlophone Records label. The catalog number should be PPCS 7088. You’ll even get extra if it has the gold sticker on the back. Initially, The Beatles’ iconic 11th studio album received mixed feedback. It’s celebrated as one of the essential rock records made, though.

The Beatles — Abbey Road (1969)

The Beatles — Abbey Road (1969)

Elvis Presley, That’s All Right (1954)

The King of Rock’n’Roll recorded That’s All Right when they took a rest from recording day. He just started jamming Arthur Crudup’s “That’s All Right, Mama.” Sam Phillips was involved in listening. He pressed record and placed “Kentucky’s Blue Moon” on the B-side. The rest, as they claim, are past. Many people believe it’s the first real rock ‘n’ roll album. Are you in mint condition? If that’s the case, you will receive around $4,000.

Elvis Presley, That’s All Right (1954)

Elvis Presley, That’s All Right (1954)

The Thirteenth Floor Elevators — Reverberation (Doubt) (1966)

The Thirteenth Floor Elevators was a trendy 1960s band. They also helped create a psychedelic rock genre. While making a huge influence on rock, the band did not stay around for long. Their singer had to contend with delusional schizophrenia. A copy of this album would get you $4,000.

The Thirteenth Floor Elevators — Reverberation (Doubt) (1966)

The Thirteenth Floor Elevators — Reverberation (Doubt) (1966)

The Beatles, Please Please Me (1963)

It’s no wonder the Beatles were hard-working. Did you know the Fab Four had to record 7 songs in one day to release Please, Please Me? They ended in 9 hours and 45 minutes. For a mono version, you will make around $4,200. But if you’re fortunate enough to own the stereo version, you can get much better rates.

The Beatles, Please Please Me (1963)

The Beatles, Please Please Me (1963)

Depeche Mode, Music for the Masses

The cover renders $4,600 worth of Music for the Masses. You will know you have this album’s original UK edition because it comes with a white-speaker image with sound waves coming from it. It should have a vivid orange backdrop, as well. The company decided to rerelease it during the ’90s and sent many of the old albums out as a mistake. These are really unusual exemplars!

Depeche Mode, Music for the Masses

Depeche Mode, Music for the Masses

Misfits, Legacy of Brutality (1985)

One of the rarest records in history may be the Residue of Violence. This is since they issued just 16 copies of this album. This is the final album to feature the work of Glen Danzig, the band’s guitarist. The album was formed after he quit the band. It contributed, of course, to a major court fight that went on for months. If you have this copy and intend to sell it, you might be $5,000 wealthier!

Misfits, Legacy of Brutality (1985)

Misfits, Legacy of Brutality (1985)

Elvis Presley — Speedway (1968)

In his profession, there was a period when Elvis Presley began dipping his toes into acting. Even though reviewers didn’t receive the film well, everyone decided that Speedway music was fantastic. They made just 300 copies of the album if the rumors are right. For $5,000, you can sell a duplicate!

Elvis Presley — Speedway (1968)

Elvis Presley — Speedway (1968)

Brute Force — King of Fuh (1969)

Thanks to the obscenity of its lyrics, this song rarely saw the light of day. They decided to soften the songs instead after big backers didn’t like it. After that, the album came out. It is important to learn that in 2010, almost half a century after it was made, they published the album. Just one thousand copies of the album have been released. You will get $5,000 for a copy of this one!

Brute Force — King of Fuh (1969)

Brute Force — King of Fuh (1969)

Elton John — I’ve Been Loving You (1968)

Elton John worked with Bernie Taupin. His buddy also received praise for several occasions driving the singer along. Years after this album was released, John admitted that he had composed the songs on his own. The single ‘I’ve Been Missing You’ is uncommon, but you can get more copies for the much rarer copy published in Portugal. You could be in for a nice $5,000 with the right collector.

Elton John — I’ve Been Loving You (1968)

Elton John — I’ve Been Loving You (1968)

Bruce Springsteen, Spirit in the Night (1973)

This song is a really unique one. For hundreds of dollars, promotional versions are offered, but the initial album may be worth as much as $5,000. When you think that you own this record, you can start searching around. The single was not quite popular, and it was only his third album, ‘Born to Fly,’ that became a commercial smash. Crowds still adore ‘Ghost in the Darkness’ these days.

Bruce Springsteen, Spirit in the Night (1973)

Bruce Springsteen, Spirit in the Night (1973)

Century Symphony Orchestra, Waltzes by Johann Strauss, Jr. (1956)

Just note, classical music is definitely going to go on forever. Music labels typically employ obscure musicians for their albums to create the album covers. Since the singer went on to be a major celebrity, the album is unique. None other than Andy Warhol was the person who produced this album cover! They discovered just 7 copies of the ledger. At the Museum of Andy Warhol, while in 2012, the other one went for $5,500.

Century Symphony Orchestra, Waltzes by Johann Strauss, Jr. (1956)

Century Symphony Orchestra, Waltzes by Johann Strauss, Jr. (1956)

Max Steiner, The Caine Mutiny

This album was a half-dialog, half-soundtrack. It was scrapped after novel writer Herman Wouk decided to avoid having the studio use his job again if they published the record. He was furious when he saw the novel lifted verbatim. That was why he and Columbia decided to avoid the release and delete all the copies they made. However, some workers preserved several originals. One edition went for $6,700 in 2007.

Max Steiner, The Caine Mutiny

Max Steiner, The Caine Mutiny

Sex Pistols, God Save the Queen (1977)

They made just 25,000 copies when pressing this record. It is assumed, however, that only ten lived when A&M killed them. The Sex Pistols hated the mark and terrorized them virtually. Rumors that John Rotten harassed and cursed execs. Meanwhile, the mark HQ reportedly destroyed the bathroom. By default, A&M didn’t like it and demanded album destruction. A lot was spared anyway. Some sold more than $8,600.

Sex Pistols, God Save the Queen (1977)

Sex Pistols, God Save the Queen (1977)

U2, Pride (In The Name Of Love) (1984)

Rumor is that only 50 records were issued for this song, so you can imagine how uncommon it is. Rolling Stone also classified the album as the 388th best song ever made. However, Bono disagrees. Even now, Bono isn’t happy with how this album came out. It applies to the civil rights era and Martin Luther King’s assassination. The specific single worth $9,000.

U2, Pride (In The Name Of Love) (1984)

U2, Pride (In The Name Of Love) (1984)

Olivia Newton-John and Electric Light Orchestra (ELO), Xanadu (1980)

Most people believe that Xanadu is one of the worst movies in film history. Given this, it’s a different matter. Rumors say that Olivia Newton-John didn’t like how she appeared on the cover, which prevented the pressing. That’s supposedly why just 20 to 30 copies survived. The album is worth $9,100 if your copy includes Olivia’s face.

Olivia Newton-John and Electric Light Orchestra (ELO), Xanadu (1980)

Olivia Newton-John and Electric Light Orchestra (ELO), Xanadu (1980)

Hank Mobley, Blue Note 1568 (1957)

Jazz lovers would realize how much influence Hank Mobley had on jazz in the ’50s. He was such a major star that urban folklore claims that the record company ran off labels when they printed the album. Blue Note has the album’s regular sticker, but its address says “47 West 63rd NYC.” Instead, some copies claim “47 West 63rd New York 23.” They’re worth $11,162!

Hank Mobley, Blue Note 1568 (1957)

Hank Mobley, Blue Note 1568 (1957)

Robert Johnson, Me and the Devil Blues (1938)

On side A of the album, you’ll hear ‘Me and the Devil Blues.’ On side B, there’s ‘Little Queen of Spades.’ This record will earn you a massive amount of money. The album ‘Me and the Devil Blues’ speaks of a singer who traded Satan’s soul to master the guitar. Many people think Johnson spoke of his own intimate encounter with the demon.

Robert Johnson, Me and the Devil Blues (1938)

Robert Johnson, Me and the Devil Blues (1938)

The White Stripes, Lafayette Blues (1998)

Did you realize that they just pressed 15 versions of Lafayette Blues? What makes it so unique is that both covers were hand-painted by a man named Dave Buick, Italy’s record founder. The copies were created for the Detroit album release show in 1998. If you went to the exhibition and charged it $6, you can now sell it for around $12,700.

The White Stripes, Lafayette Blues (1998)

The White Stripes, Lafayette Blues (1998)

Stonewall, Stonewall (1976)

Stonewall is one of the most significant psychedelic rock bands out there. However, they didn’t sign to a record company, which may explain why you didn’t know of them. Even, they’re an essential bunch. They have just one release, but not with their permission. If you buy one of them, maybe you’re in for $14,000.

Stonewall, Stonewall (1976)

Stonewall, Stonewall (1976)

Röyksopp, Melody A.M. (2001)

This album was a big commercial hit. Röyksopp is a Norwegian electronic duo who made the U.S. huge. They have a song named ‘Remind Me,’ used in a Geico advertisement. Melody A.M. Published 2001. So much so that they sold more than 1 million copies. Banksy hand-painted a hundred documents. If you buy one, it’s worth $14,204.

Röyksopp, Melody A.M. (2001)

Röyksopp, Melody A.M. (2001)

The Beatles, Yesterday and Today (1966)

Did you know the initial album cover had members sporting butcher’s attire? They had raw meat on their laps and infant dolls in their mouths. We don’t know why they did this, and the picture didn’t receive a decent response. Capitol Records had to pay $250,000 to purchase back the 750,000 records sent to retailers. Of necessity, recovering each of them was unlikely. If you have this specific edition, you should prepare to earn $15,000 for it.

The Beatles, Yesterday and Today (1966)

The Beatles, Yesterday and Today (1966)

The Rolling Stones, Street Fighting Man (1968)

This album even came with a very divisive title, censoring the record company. In the initial version, a black and white picture of cops watched over a wounded protestor. Before publishing the record, a notorious riot took place at 1968’s Democratic National Convention. That’s why the label didn’t think the cover would be a smart idea and required these albums to be burned. About 18 were rescued. One auctioned in 2011 for $17,000.

The Rolling Stones, Street Fighting Man (1968)

The Rolling Stones, Street Fighting Man (1968)

The Five Sharps, Stormy Weather (1952)

Here is one more amazingly unique record! There are only 3 known copies in nature so far. You already need to realize the uncommon ones are important. The revenues were so poor when this record was first released that the band’s founders had to procure it independently. Incredibly, a clone goes for $20,000 right now.

The Five Sharps, Stormy Weather (1952)

The Five Sharps, Stormy Weather (1952)

The Velvet Underground, The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967)

This album has had a considerable effect on punk rock. There was a moment when the album was almost forbidden! It nevertheless managed to sell 30,000 copies, despite this. A duplicate of the uncommon album was discovered at a flea market by a record dealer from Canada. And though he charged just 75 cents for it, he now offers it for 25,200 bucks.

The Velvet Underground, The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967)

The Velvet Underground, The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967)

Frank Wilson, Do I Love You (Indeed I Do)

Frank Wilson made records of ‘Do I Love You’ and ‘Sweeter As the Days Go By.’ He decided with Motown manager Berry Gordy not long after this, though, that he was a stronger choice behind the scenes. Then, Gordy directed the dissolution of the press. It was only made out unchanged with 2 versions. For years, one of them has been placed in a Motown vault. The other one, however, was auctioned off in 2009 for about $34,000.

Frank Wilson, Do I Love You (Indeed I Do)

Frank Wilson, Do I Love You (Indeed I Do)

Bob Dylan, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (1963)

This album brings with it an amusing tale. The intention was to substitute a couple of tracks in the beginning before it was published, but somebody didn’t get the memo. This is why the initial listing contains many versions. “You might be richer by $35,000 if a copy ends with -1A and has “Rocks and Dirt,” “Gamblin ‘Willie’s Dead Man’s Side,” “Let Me Die In My Footsteps,” and “Talkin’ John Birch Blues.

Bob Dylan, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (1963)

Bob Dylan, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (1963)

Tommy Johnson, Alcohol And Jake Blues (1930)

In the world of music, speak about a real gem! This record was found in North Carolina, solely by chance. On eBay, the seller then added it for sale and was surprised by the response. There are 2 documented versions in nature, and both of them belong to John Tefteller, the victorious bidder. He paid 37,000 dollars for that!

Tommy Johnson, Alcohol And Jake Blues (1930)

Tommy Johnson, Alcohol And Jake Blues (1930)

Prince, The Black Album

He wanted to stop it not long after Prince launched ‘The Funk Bible,’ and charged the record company to recover all the albums. Apparently, he felt that the album was ‘negative.’ But, as every single was pirated and aired on the radio, it did not succeed. Prince had a more change of heart in the end and published it on CD in 1994. In 2018, $42,300 was obtained from an initial and unopened American press. In the meanwhile, a Canadian unsealed duplicate went for $27,500.

Prince, The Black Album

Prince, The Black Album

Aphex Twin AKA Caustic Window, Caustic Window

To record the eponymous song, Aphex Twin used the term Caustic Window. However, after producing just 5 copies, he decided to leave it. It was a positive thing that they got out of one of them, regardless. In 2017, the record was viewed on Discogs. There was a starting price of 13,500 dollars! In the end, for $46,300, the record was acquired by none other than Markus Persson, the maker of Minecraft.

Aphex Twin AKA Caustic Window, Caustic Window

Aphex Twin AKA Caustic Window, Caustic Window

The Beatles, The Beatles (AKA “The White Album”) (1968)

The song in question is the very first press release of the Beatles’ 9th album. This exact copy has “A0000001” as its serial number. For years, there have been reports that John Lennon has a copy of it. The truth, however, was that Ringo Starr had it! For 35 years, the duplicate remained locked in a bank vault and was sold off at a charity sale for a record $790,000. If you are good enough to buy a low serial number duplicate, you could be in for $13,750.

The Beatles, The Beatles (AKA “The White Album”) (1968)

The Beatles, The Beatles (AKA “The White Album”) (1968)

Steel City Connection, Dansation/Steel City Disco (1978)

This vinyl will sell for approximately $885 nowadays. That’s a huge paycheck, relative to the price anyone might be able to pay for it when it was published in 1978! The tracks on this album have been big successes, making sense to see how much today’s album is worth.

Steel City Connection Dansation, Steel City Disco

Steel City Connection, Dansation/Steel City Disco (1978)

Thrillers/Delta Cats, Last Dance/Unworthy Baby (1968)

This record was issued back in 1968 by Blue Cat Records. Today? Now, right? They’re going for over $1,000 a slice! Both the UK classes with extensive fan bases are Delta Cats and Trillers. In reality, not only are their fans from the United Kingdom, they still have plenty of foreign fans.

Thrillers Delta Cats, Last Dance Unworthy Baby

Thrillers/Delta Cats, Last Dance/Unworthy Baby (1968)

Terea, Terea (1977)

There are eight tracks on this 1977 album, and it used to retail for the same price as the average vinyl. Nowadays, though, you’d have to struggle for one of these records to keep your hands on it. All of them costs around 1,700 dollars! This album was the second of two albums recorded by the project, and still, now, it’s a major success!

Terea, Terea

Terea, Terea (1977)

Nirvana, Love Buzz/Big Cheese (1988)

Finding anyone who hasn’t yet learned about Nirvana is pretty tough. This illustrates why their music is so famous and how thousands of dollars are worth of their records. This album will sell for well over 3,000 dollars these days! However, the true difficulty is to locate it in the first place to obtain it. This album is exceptionally unique.

Nirvana Love Buzz Big Cheese

Nirvana, Love Buzz/Big Cheese (1988)

World’s Experience Orchestra, The Beginning Of A New Birth (1975)

While this famous soul-jazz album only has two tracks, one is 22 minutes long, and the other is 14 minutes long. You will feel the greatness of the World’s Experience Orchestra’s music when listening to this record. It is possible to purchase this vinyl for more than $3,500 now.

World's Experience Orchestra, The Beginning Of A New Birth

World’s Experience Orchestra, The Beginning Of A New Birth (1975)

Tudor Lodge, Tudor Lodge (1971)

These days, this vinyl is worth nothing short of a fortune. On either foot, it has six tracks. If you’re fortunate, for around $3,540, you’d be willing to purchase this album from anyone. We know this is a high price tag, but on this record, you’d be having some great and classic tracks.

Tudor Lodge, Tudor Lodge

Tudor Lodge, Tudor Lodge (1971)

The Smiths, Hand In Glove/Handsome Devil (1984)

This album was not released until 1984, but it was made in Stockport, England, at Strawberry Studios in February 1983. Currently, this vinyl is known to be part of the category of jangles and British Music. Be willing to pay as much as $3,500 or more if you wish to purchase this album today.

The Smiths, Hand In Glove

The Smiths, Hand In Glove (1984)

Pink Floyd, The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn (1967)

Despite the reality that many of the younger people were not around to listen to their music as it came out, Pink Floyd is one of those artists that just about everybody has heard of. It took three months for this album to be made at EMI Studios in London, and it was released in May 1967.

Pink Floyd, The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn

Pink Floyd, The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn (1967)

Nicholas Greenwood, Cold Cuts (1972)

There are ten tracks on this record. Every single one of these songs earned favorable reviews, “unpredictable” being the album. As a retro vinyl, the album became an immediate success and won its place. One of these today will cost more than $3,500.

Nicholas Greenwood, Cold Cuts

Nicholas Greenwood, Cold Cuts (1972)

Charlie Parker, Bird Blows The Blues (1949)

There are six tracks on this record on Track A and a further seven on Track B. Yeah, all 13 of these songs have found their way into the hearts of people. This album is used as a jazz album that gives it a boppy tune. This is something that a vast range of individuals will appreciate. Today, this album can be bought for roughly $3,540.

Charlie Parker, The Bird Blows The Blues

Charlie Parker, The Bird Blows The Blues (1949)

ADVERTISEMENT